Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Change


Yukon goes Colorado...

The indicator swam downstream, chasing a twelve inch rainbow that was now running scared. My leader had cut as I extended the rubber basket toward the head I had just turned. And now, the small trout that controlled his pursuer, was fighting hard to escape. I watched as the white bobber stopped mid-stream, the fish turning to catch his breath, finding respite in a pocket of slack water behind a small chunk of unpolished granite. Maybe this is why I don’t use indicators.

It was still dark when I turned into the Denver neighborhood, and to Ivan’s credit, the fact that I was late played little into the conversation as we headed south towards Deckers.

Change comes to us all differently. For Ivan, it’s learning the difference between the familiar of Montana, to the new of Colorado. For me it could be the changing of a career, trading copiers for something else. Anything else. Or it could be the stubborn refusal to use indicators, not wanting to change something that may or may not be working. But regardless of when change happens, it’s there to humble you. And more often than not, it’s there to help you grow, if only, to get you over your fear of bobbers.

Tying a new double surgeons knot into the leader, I rolled out a few feet of 6X fluorocarbon, attaching an unnatural dry fly above a dropped halo midge.

Walking downstream, I ripped some line from my reel, watching the water for the indicator that remained attached to the resident rainbow. The plastic ball was found swaying in the current, as my newly tied flies swung downstream. And as the line crossed the bridge of the trouts nose, I pulled tight.

Lifting the rod, the indicator danced midair, and the weight of the fish fought purposefully against the pressure he now felt. The fish was quickly turned, presumably still tired from the last fight. Ivan met him easily, scooping him quickly into the rubber mesh.

And as we looked into the net, we both found something to smile about. Ivan found a new river entertaining, enjoying each step in pursuit of something he knows well.

I found a trout, four flies, and an indicator. I had found some change.




23 comments:

  1. Cool story bro ;-). There's more to indicator fishing than meets the eye. Fishing the Juan, you wait for your indicator to twitch, you've lost half your fish. Mike

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    1. Thanks Mike!

      I am learning so about fishing the indicator. Seems my learning curve just expanded...

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  2. The world always comes full circle, the end now the beginning, the new becoming familiar.

    The fact we interact with change on rivers, lakes, and streams...with friends old and new, not only makes it better, it makes it real.

    Nicely done.

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    1. Thanks, I appreciate it.

      A river has a way of twisting us good. Can't imagine not sharing and interacting in such places.

      Cheers

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  3. Very enjoyable Sanders. I am thankful that there is always something new...even in the old.

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    1. Thanks Howard. Always something new...can't beat it!

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  4. Nice story...Without change the world would be a mighty boring place. Change often equates to new challenges , and for alot of us that challenge is what we're really seeking to begin with.

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    1. No doubt. Change keeps it interesting, and us going. Gotta love new adventures.

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  5. Very cool. Great story bud, it just may get me back to typing.

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    1. Thanks JT! I've been in a slump myself lately. Start pecking at that keyboard...it will happen.

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  6. Kudos to you Sanders. You've managed to describe the thoughts I have yet to completely solidify in my brain piece. Thank you for clearing it up for me.

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    1. Thanks man! Change is a funny thing...although, it is nice to know that your not alone going through it (my new job). Glad you made it to CO to help me out...ha!

      Cheers

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  7. I use a product called Biostrike so I can find those wet flies I fish. Funny thing the brookies at times hit it faster than the fly.

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    1. I've hear of the biostrike, one of my friends swears by it. I'll definitely check it out. Thanks

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  8. I'm with brk trt! Loon makes it. Sinks most of the time, but if you drop it in the middle of the leader you can still see it. Funny you wrote this while I was using no indicator on the Rio Grande thinking... Sanders laughs at my indicator.

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    1. Your the friend that swears by it...ha! I still laugh at indicators, funny little things.

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  9. I haven't tried an indicator yet even though I have a couple of different types. I've still be having to much fun with the dries. Great story. I'll bet fishing with either of you guys is a blast!

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  10. Sanders
    Another great post as only you could convey it. The indicator is one of the hardest things I had to master when starting to trout fish, and I am still working on reading the takes. I am back after over a month of work on Family Ancestry. I have been working on this project for over 2 years, some of the most interesting research I have ever worked on. Thanks for sharing a great post!!

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  11. Colorado is quickly becoming the center of the fly fishing blogging universe... and rightly so. Nice work, my friend.

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  12. The more things stay the same the more they change. I don't know know who said that and I'm still working on the meaning. 4 flies and an indicator.. sweet haul!

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  13. The list grows to the Rocky Mtn Frenzy next spring! That is ok with me! Welcome, Ivan. Welcome, Indicators!!! If I didn't have my little bubble to watch when a fish took a nibble... I would be totally lost. Change for me is putting a dry fly on!

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  14. Nice looking fish- I have a hard time with change as well.

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  15. Great stuff thanks for posting!! ill be back!!
    such a shame, i didn’t know about this beautiful site until today.

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